Net Inclusion

Content tagged with "Net Inclusion"

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Pierrette Dagg on Research, Engagement, and Digital Inclusion - Building for Digital Equity Podcast Episode 17

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Our Building for Digital Equity podcast series is back.

The first episode of 2024 features an insightful conversation with Pierrette Renée Dagg, Director of Research for the MERIT Network in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Pierrette discusses the importance of using research to inform community engagement and digital equity strategies, as well as the use of community-facing research methods like surveys and qualitative/quantitative analysis. She also highlights the importance of considering broader systemic issues that should be taken into account when forming digital equity strategies.

This show is 10 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below. 

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Joseph McDade for the music. The song is On the Verge and is used per his Free-Use terms.

IN OUR VIEW: ‘Without Political Power, There is No Path to Digital Equity’

For decades, ILSR has recognized that communities need to be engaged on Internet access issues to make sure that everyone – from low-income, historically marginalized residents to small businesses and even municipal departments – have the Internet access they need to thrive in the digital age.

Digital equity is essential to help resolve other challenges and the current chasm between the haves and have-nots makes solving many other challenges – like education – more difficult.

To further the quest for greater digital inclusivity, recently ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Initiative Director Christopher Mitchell put together a panel for Net Inclusion 2024, a conference convened by the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA) that drew 1300 attendees and was by far the largest digital inclusion conference held in many years of doing this work.

Entitled “Without Political Power, There is No Path to Digital Equity,” the panel was originally going to focus on the importance of structural change – and how we cannot ensure everyone is connected by relying solely on the networks already present in neighborhoods that see quite low broadband penetration. Instead, the panel discussion went a bit deeper than that and landed on an observation often made by Joshua Edmonds from Digital C in Cleveland. To paraphrase Joshua, we cannot coupon our way to digital equity.

Without Political Power, There is No Path to Digital Equity - Episode 591 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast

Episode 591 of the Community Broadband Bits Podcast features a panel from Net Inclusion that Christopher Mitchell moderated entitled, "Without Political Power, There is No Path to Digital Equity." In it, panelists raise difficult questions for the digital equity movement about whether they are on track to achieve their goals - whether the main strategies used today can result in digital equity or are destined to fall well short.

Panelists include Melanie Silva, COO of Hinton & Company in Chattanooga; Shayna Englin, Director of the Digital Equity Initiative at the California Community Foundation; Joshua Edmonds, CEO of Digital C in Cleveland; and Dan Ryan, Vice-Chair of the Enterprise Center in Chattanooga.

The discussion includes constructive criticism of the movement for digital equity, as well as more specific criticism of the decision to move the Net Inclusion conference from Chattanooga to Philadelphia. That decision was entangled with - and justified by - the concerns of some regarding safety in the wake of attempts in the Tennessee Legislature to revoke the rights of Transgender individuals, among others. The panel felt it was important not to ignore those issues as we wrangled with the larger issue of building a better society with more rights and opportunities for everyone.

We hope you find this discussion useful and respectful of the larger movement despite disagreements on some important issues.

This show is 93 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below.

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show: please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Arne Huseby for the music. The song is Warm Duck Shuffle and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license.

Save The Date: #B4DE Life After ACP

With the nation's premier digital inclusion conference in full swing right now in Philadelphia – and with yet another banner year in broadband in the making – the first Building For Digital Equity (B4DE) livestream event of the year is now set for March 20.

As you read this, the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA), organizers of Net Inclusion 2024, are engaging with hundreds of digital inclusion practitioners, advocates, academics, Internet service providers, and policymakers from across the nation at the conference. Joining them there in the City of Brotherly Love is a full complement of the Institute for Local Self Reliance (ILSR) Community Broadband Networks team. The energy and ideas from the event will inform the upcoming B4DE that will feature the theme: Life After ACP.

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B4DE March 2024 save the date flyer

We encourage you to save the date and register here for the popular (and free) virtual gathering to be held March 20, 2024 from 3 to 4:15 PM ET.

Coming on the heels of our last B4DE event in December, digital inclusion advocates are strategizing around how to tackle the broadband affordability challenge as the FCC winds down the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP).

Ebony Cooksie on Transitioning to Digital Equity Work - Building for Digital Equity Podcast Episode 16

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Ebony Cooksie is the Market Development Manager and Government Affairs Coordinator for NextLink Internet and we talked at Net Inclusion about how she transitioned from working in education to digital equity. With so many people new to this field, transitioning often from health and medical fields, we thought it would be helpful to talk about the transition.

This show is 13 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below. 

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Joseph McDade for the music. The song is On the Verge and is used per his Free-Use terms.

Dave Sevick and Computer Reach Go In the Home - Building for Digital Equity Podcast Episode 15

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Dave Sevick, Executive Director at Computer Reach in Pittsburgh, has taken his experience helping people with devices and supercharged it for digital equity work. Computer Reach refurbishes computers and sends digital navigators into the home in both urban and rural areas, which is an interesting challenge that many have not attempted. We talk about how they are funded and why they often use Linux-powered devices, among many other topics. 

This show is 18 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below. 

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Joseph McDade for the music. The song is On the Verge and is used per his Free-Use terms.

Marvin Venay Takes Tech Home in Boston - Building for Digital Equity Podcast Episode 14

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Marvin Venay is the Chief Advocacy Officer for Tech Goes Home in Boston, a digital equity organization that has been building tech skills and working on the digital divide for longer than most. Sean Gonsalves talks with him about their process, how they continued to thrive even after the BTOP money dried up years ago, navigating the pandemic, expanding further into Massachusetts, and their future plans.

This show is 19 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below. 

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Joseph McDade for the music. The song is On the Verge and is used per his Free-Use terms.

Aneta Lee, FUSE Corps Fellow in Birmingham, Alabama on Episode 6 of the Building for Digital Equity Podcast

On the latest episode of our Building For Digital Equity podcast, we are joined by Aneta Lee, a FUSE Corps Fellow working with the city of Birmingham, Alabama to strategize and conceptualize around the city’s role in closing the digital divide in Magic City.

Aneta shares with us how she came to work with the city and some of the initiatives that have been launched to advance digital equity. She also speaks about the city’s work with Education SuperHighway on an Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) outreach campaign known as Connect 99.

Lastly, Aneta talks about her willingness to work with other communities to help craft their digital equity plans.

This show is 15 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

 

 

Aneta Lee, FUSE Corps Fellow in Birmingham, Alabama - Building for Digital Equity Podcast Episode 6

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At the time of this interview at Net Inclusion, Aneta Lee was wrapping up her FUSE Corps Fellowship with the city of Birmingham in Alabama. We talk about the FUSE Corps Fellowship and her time at the city of Birmingham. Aneta discusses the ACP outreach campaign she put together and where she sees her future taking her - HINT, it could be to your community if you act fast!

This show is 15 minutes long and can be played on this page or using the podcast app of your choice with this feed.

Transcript below. 

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

Listen to other episodes here or see other podcasts from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance here.

Thanks to Joseph McDade for the music. The song is On the Verge and is used per his Free-Use terms.

Two New Episodes of the Building for Digital Podcast Now Available

This week we are giving you a double dose of our new Building For Digital Equity podcast. In Episode 4, our research associate Emma Gautier interviews Kim Ilinon and Ella Silvas, two Interactive Media Design students from the University of Washington-Bothell.

Kim and Ella, who both gave lightning round presentations at Net Inclusion 2023 in San Antonio last month, discuss how they got into digital equity from a design background and what they have learned about who is doing digital equity work in Washington state.

You can watch their 3 minute lightning talk here:

Remote video URL

And you can listen to the 12-minute long B4DE podcast with Kim and Ella here:

Also available is Episode 5 of the B4DE podcast, which features Susan Corbett, Executive Director of the National Digital Equity Center, an organization that has long been involved in policy around Internet access and digital equity both in Maine and across the United States.

ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Director Christopher Mitchell discusses with Susan how she got started doing digital equity work in 2005 as the owner of a small ISP in rural Maine. They also explore how the National Digital Equity Center uses a database and surveys to track the progress of their programs to ensure they are effective, having launched initiatives around distributed devices, skill building, and now involved with the Maine Digital Equity Plan.

That episode is 14 minutes long, which you can tune into here: